Home » HISTORIC ASSETS » STATE AND NATIONAL REGISTERS

STATE AND NATIONAL REGISTERS

title historic areas

The Historical Commission is charged with the responsibility to seek, identify and promote its most significant historic and archaeological properties for designation on the State and National Registers for Historic Places. Thus far, of our total of about 500 historic properties, we have managed fewer than ten designations.

While designation on the State and National Registers is purely honorary, such designation raises the significance of those properties and areas and raises the ‘Power of Place’ of the town. Other designations such as Preservation Restriction offers real protection comparable and often exceeding the protection of a Local Historic District.  For completeness, we also list the properties under Preservation Restrictions.


The following are the properties and areas thus far designated on the State and National Registers for Historic Places.

STATE REGISTER DESIGNATION ABBREVIATIONS

NOTE:  The format for the designations used in the following table is RRR: DDD – PPP, where RRR is the REGISTER DESIGNATION, DDD is the DATE and PPP is the NUMBER OF PROPERTIES

  • LHD = Local Historic District
  • LL = Local Landmark
  • MA/HL = MA Archaeological/Historic Landmark
  • NHL = National Historic Landmark (properties of outstanding national significance, designated directly by the Department of Interior)
  • NRDIS = National Register (of Historic Places) District
  • NRIND = National Register (of Historic Places) Individual Property
  • PR = Preservation Restriction
  • RHD = Regional Historic District
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION

1. Fort Devens Historic District The 300 acre district is roughly bounded by El Cagney and Antietam Streets, Sherman and MacArthur Avenues and Buena Vista Street. The district includes Vicksburg Square and Roger’s Field parade grounds and consists of 93 contributing buildings, five sites, one structure and four objects. Here is a map of the area.


State Register of Historic Places

NRDIS: 10 June 1993-95; LHD: 18 Nov 1994-95
2. Fruitlands

102 Prospect Hill Road

One of the first outdoor museums in America, as Fruitlands visitors discover the stories, experiments and ideals of the Alcotts, Thoreau, Emerson, the Shakers, utopians, artists and native peoples. Fruitlands’ four galleries, singular collections, over 200 pastoral acres, trails and vistas stir the imagination.National Historic Landmark designation includes only one building, Fruitlands, not the entire museum site. Fruitlands is well known as the site of a communal living experiment begun by Amos Bronson Alcott and Charles Lane in 1843. Here is a map of the area.


State Register of Historic Places
MA/HL 04/01/1966-1; PR 04/01/1966-1;NHL 03/19/1974-1; NRIND 03/19/1974-1;
NRDIS OS/23/1997-3; PR 03/10/1998-1
3. Fruitlands Museums Historic District

102 Prospect Hill Road

Designation includes four museums; Fruitlands, the Shaker Museum, the Indian Museum, the Picture Museum, and seven ancillary buildings. The 130-acre site stretches west from Prospect Hill Road to the Boston and Maine Railroad right-of-way and the Oxbow National Wildlife Refuge. Here is a map of the area.


State Register of Historic Places
NRDIS 23 May 1997-31
4. Harvard Center Historic District Includes Harvard Common Historic District, established in 1975. Considered one of Harvard’s special places. Includes Ayer road/Massachusetts Avenue, Still River Road, Elm Street, Lovers Lane, Littleton Road, Old Littleton Road, Oak Hill Road, Cross Street, Fairbanks Street, Old Boston Turnpike, Pond Road, Bolton Road and Warren Avenue. Here is a map of the area.


State Register of Historic Places

NRDIS 09/22/1997-125
5. Harvard Common Historic District (See map in Historic Districts.) Includes the common and abutting properties as well as properties located south of the common to Pond Road.The Center cemetery, on what was once part of the original Common, holds gravestones from the late 18th into the late 19th century. It is a well-maintained cemetery that includes the works of two of the well-known Harvard stone carvers Thomas Park and Jonathan Worster. Both carvers used high quality slate from Pin Hill, where the carvers were part of a cooperative, which came to an abrupt end when someone decided to use dynamite to get the slate and fractured all that remained. Throughout the cemetery are many interesting epitaphs documenting disease, accidental deaths, infant mortality, death by childbirth and slavery. Here is a map of the area.


State Register of Historic Places

LHD 03/27/1975-32; NRDIS 09/22/1997-32
6. Captain Thaddeus Pollard House

327 Still River Road

 Writing in 1894, local antiquarian Nourse described this Georgian colonial plantation estate as “a fine specimen of the architecture of Revolutionary days” (Nourse, 1894:75). The historic property is  listed in our Local Register of Historic Places (HRV-76) as well as the Massachusetts Historical Commission’s MACRIS. Captain Thaddeus Pollard built this house for his family when he came to Harvard from Bolton. He was a successful blacksmith, and a clear sign of his prosperity was the inclusion of a swinging wall on the second floor.


PR  March 2015; HISTORIC: New England

 7. Harvard Shaker Village Historic District and 

Shaker Village Cemetery

Roughly Shaker and South Shaker Roads and Maple Lane. (See Map in Historic Districts.) Here is a map of the area.   Visit Marc Sevigny’s comprehensive Harvard Shaker Village website.

An excerpt from the National Park Service’s Shaker Historic Trail webpage on the Shaker Cemetery:“Positioned near the South Family complex, the Harvard Shaker Village Cemetery offers a different look at Shaker history. With the first burial recorded in 1792, the cemetery is the final resting place of more than 300 members of the Harvard community. Walking among the cast iron grave markers, visitors can follow chronologically the life and times of the people of the Harvard Shaker Village and slowly piece together the past for themselves.”


State Register of Historic Places

LHD 26 April 1974-40; NRDIS 30 October 1989-40
8. South Shaker Stone Barn Foundation

99 South Shaker Road

Included within the Harvard Shaker Village Historic District. Identified in the National Register inventory as the ‘South Family Stone Barn foundations’ in 1989. Built in 1835, collapsed 1975. Here is a map of the area.

_______________
State Register of Historic Places
LHD 26 April 1974-1; NRDIS 30 October 1989-1; PR 16 December 1996-1,
9. Still River Baptist Church

215 Still River Road

Now known as the Still River Meetinghouse, home of the Harvard Historical Society (HHS) and their museum. The HHS property also includes a cottage and a carriage house now serving as the Curator’s Quarters. Here is a map of the area.


State Register of Historic Places

NRIND 13 December 1996-5; PR 06/21/2001-5, 
10. Frederick Fiske and Gretchen Osgood Warren House

42 Bolton Road

Known as the ‘Fiske Warren’ House.  The Fiske Warren House dates from 1894 and is located on a 10.6 acre site. Here is a map of the area. Here is a map of the area.


State Register of Historic Places

 
NRIND 6 December 1996-5

CANDIDATE PROPERTIES FOR

DESIGNATION TO STATE AND NATIONAL REGISTERS

The following is a list of historic properties that have been recommended in the past as candidates for designation to the State and National Registers for Historic Places.

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION
Bare Hill Pond Classified as a ‘Great Pond’, the 321-acre pond is one of the town’s most significant natural assets and a historic asset as well. Includes its watersheds and the Frederick Fiske and Gretchen Osgood Warren House. Townspeople regard the beach as their ‘Aquatic Common.” The area includes the area and history of Fiske Warren’s ‘Tahanto Enclave’ and other history associated with the pond’s islands and beach area. Here is a map of the area.

_______________
Not designated 
Bellevue Cemetery
Description to be inserted later.

_______________
Not designated
Center Cemetery
Description to be inserted later.

_______________
Not designated
Holy Hill
Holy Hill of Zion, located on South Shaker Road, was established by the Shakers as an outdoor worship area commonly referred to as ‘the Dancing Ground.’ The land was acquired by the Conservation Commission in 1972. Here is a map of the area.

_______________
Not designated
Old Mill Pond
Site of the first mill built in present-day Harvard by John Prescott of Lancaster in 1668. The mill was probably the first permanent building built in present-day Harvard. John Prescott built the mill for his son, Jonas who operated the mill for several years mostly as a service for the people of Groton. After Jonas married in 1672, he built his home by the mill and raised his family there.  In 1818, William Adams built a new mill at this location and over the years, there was a mill at this location as shown in the maps or photos in 1831, 1870 and up until 1888 when it burned down while it was under the ownership of the Shakers. They apparently rebuilt the mill as shown in the Harvard map of 1898 when the Shakers continued to own the building. Here is a map of the area.

_______________
Not designated
Shaker Spring House
Description to be inserted later.

_______________
Not designated
Still River Village/Prospect Hill
Still River Village is a small cluster of significantly intact 17th, 18th and 19th-century buildings extending a mile along Still River Road. Although the village has been surveyed, only the Still River Baptist Church at 213 Still River road is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Prospect Hill, a long ridge overlooking the Nashua River, provide outstanding scenic vistas of Harvard’s rural character. Here is a map of the area.


Not designated

Pin Hill
Approximately 75 acres, Pin Hill is noted for its historic slate quarries, 19th-century mill features and scenic rock outcroppings. Here is a map of the area.

_______________
Not designated
Shaker Spring House
Description to be inserted later.

_______________
Not designated

 https://historicharvard.wordpress.com/historic-assets-2/historic-areas/



Please submit all comments on the FRONT PAGE (Home). Thank you.